Author Topic: Where to post?  (Read 86 times)

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Insomniadebtstress

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Where to post?
« on: July 20, 2016 11:06:19 AM »
I am new to DebtorBoards and will read up on abbreviations next.

In a nutshell so I can be pointed to the proper board...

DH has some past judgements (2-5 years old). All tried to garnish wages, none could because at the time DH only had a small s-corp painting business (some tried to garnish from a past employer).

One judgement came after business and we are paying that law office monthly so they wouldn't freeze the little we had in the business bank account.

DH now has a regular paying job. I know SOL would apply for part of this, but that looks to be 10 years. Also, in Florida DH can claim head of household and avoid garnishment.

My concern/question is this: how can we be better prepared for some of these past judgements to be renewed? Be proactive and get them off now? How to do that? Could he still file HOH even though he didn't the first time judgement went through (didn't do anything, just let them serve all the papers)?

kevinmanheim

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Re: Where to post?
« Reply #1 on: July 20, 2016 11:38:53 AM »
How many judgments? How big are they?

When you make payments to the law firm, are you getting a monthly statement of the balance? If not, you need to be prepared to later find out that the payments you've been making may not even cover the interest on the judgment, and that the amount you owe has increased since you began monthly payments.

Have you considered bankruptcy to wipe all this out?

In Florida, the judgment is good for 10 years. However, it can be renewed by the creditor for an additional 10 years.

Bruno the JDB Killer

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Re: Where to post?
« Reply #2 on: July 20, 2016 01:32:42 PM »
The only way to "get rid" of a judgment is to pay it off or settle it. Settling is difficult because you have no leverage. As Kevin pointed out, payments do not go right to the balance. They usually go Legal fees > Court Costs > Interest > Principal.
I am not an attorney. Any information I post is strictly my opinion and should be treated as such.

 

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