Author Topic: Question  (Read 541 times)

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Myrovic

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Question
« on: March 11, 2012 03:55:43 AM »
Hi folks,

I have an interesting question that may be a bit unethical but possibly effective, so please bear with me while I explain the elements of my reasoning.

We know that JDBs more than likely do not have sufficient information to validate their claims of a debt.

Suppose that the claimed debt is outside the SOL. Would a claim of possible identity theft (assuming the JDB did not send you requested information) be a plausible way to get their attention or get the claimed TL off your CRs?

Thanks Guys for the brainstorming!

arnanda

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Re: Question
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2012 05:00:27 AM »
Generally they want you to give them a copy of a police report and/or FTC ID Theft Affidavit.  It depends on their policies what they would do on the credit report--I'd imagine they'd want the documentation before so they can perform a reasonable investigation. 
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KFMAN

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Re: Question
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2012 03:16:24 PM »
Hi folks,

I have an interesting question that may be a bit unethical but possibly effective, so please bear with me while I explain the elements of my reasoning.

We know that JDBs more than likely do not have sufficient information to validate their claims of a debt.

Suppose that the claimed debt is outside the SOL. Would a claim of possible identity theft (assuming the JDB did not send you requested information) be a plausible way to get their attention or get the claimed TL off your CRs?

Thanks Guys for the brainstorming!
I think Fraud would be a better charge.  What state are you in?

kevinmanheim

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Re: Question
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2012 03:23:33 PM »
Never lie about anything that may later be presented in court.

Ever.

If it is out of SOL, dispute it, send the JDB a DV and wait for them to violate a law.

I would then sue them for the violation, using it as leverage.

NotBonJovi

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Re: Question
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2012 03:53:42 PM »
Never lie about anything that may later be presented in court.

Ever.

If it is out of SOL, dispute it, send the JDB a DV and wait for them to violate a law.

I would then sue them for the violation, using it as leverage.

+1

Don't make us get the rolled-up newspaper.
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Belle2004

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Re: Question
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2012 03:58:05 PM »
I don't mean to be rude but these kind of actions are the reason people that truly are a victim of identity theft don't  get taken seriously without having to jump through all kinds of hoops.

 My daughter had her identity stolen while she was in college back when it was still a relatively new crime. The braniac administration used their SS#'s as their student ID #.

Someone one the inside sold them to a bunch of people. It was a nightmare getting it straightened out. The police didn't even know how to fill out a crime report on it (although admittedly we live in a sort of backwater town). The credit bureaus definitely required a police report.

PLEASE do NOT waste the police departments time (with a false report no less) and do not pretend to be a victim of a crime when you clearly are not.




KFMAN

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Re: Question
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2012 04:30:20 PM »
About 6 years ago, my sons HS was using it.

HarryC

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Re: Question
« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2012 09:53:45 PM »
For years and years and years, the State of Virginia used peoples' SSNs as their driver's license numbers
I'm not a lawyer and I'm not even very smart.  You'd be well advised not to listen to anything I have to say.

Fighting Irish

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Re: Question
« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2012 11:23:46 PM »
Here's a hint: any time you have a thought that begins with "This may be a bit unethical..." stop thinking the thought.

We have enough legal and ethical ways to deal with JDBs. We don't need to stoop to their level.

Rolled up newspaper, or grounded.

Which would you prefer?
Dang it, Jim! I'm a nurse, not an attorney!

(The rest of you, keep that in mind, too.)

 

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